Our Code of Conduct

We take our role and responsibilities to our members and licensees very seriously.  It is our ambition to set best practice in collecting society management across all areas of our membership and domestic licensing activity.  As part of that commitment we have developed and published a Code of Conduct that encompasses the whole of the business.  It is based on the British Copyright Council’s Principles for Collective Management Organisations’ Codes of Conduct and was published in November 2012 following consultation with members, licence holders, and other stakeholder representatives, including trade bodies and Ombudsman Services.

Our Code of Conduct covers all aspects of PRS for Music membership and areas we license from shops to new online streaming services.  It details what you can expect from our service to you, including what you can expect by way of provision and/or publication of information affecting members and music users individually and generally.  It also explains how we can help each other and what to do if things go wrong.

Complaints - last three years ending 31 December 2016

Licensing

In 2016, PRS for Music received 92 complaints pertaining to licensing and none were referred to the Ombudsman. Of these 92 complaints, four were outstanding at the end of the year, of which two were received on or after 20 December and two required legal and commercial assistance.

In 2015, PRS for Music received 78 complaints pertaining to licensing and none were referred to the Ombudsman. Of these 78 complaints, two cases remained open at the end of 2015 - both were received on 23 December.

In 2014, PRS for Music received 100 complaints pertaining to licensing and none were referred to the Ombudsman. Of those 100 complaints, four cases remained open at the end of 2014 – and all of them had come in on the 17 December or later.

Membership

In 2016, Membership received nine complaints with two being referred to the Ombudsman. No complaints were upheld. There were no open complaints at the end of 2016.

In 2015, Membership received five complaints with one being referred to the Ombudsman. This claim was not upheld. There were no open complaints at the end of 2015.

In 2014, Membership received 15 complaints and none were referred to the Ombudsman. One of the complaints remained open at the end of 2014.