CISAC works with UNESCO to explore ways of addressing the ‘transfer of value‘

On June 12th creators and copyright experts will gather in Paris as CISAC joins a conference hosted by UNESCO exploring the transfer of value and the challenges it brings to creative industries

A word map showing transfer of value in international languages

On June 12th creators and copyright experts will gather in Paris as CISAC joins a conference hosted by UNESCO exploring the transfer of value and the challenges it brings to creative industries.

As part of CISAC’s global campaign on the transfer of value, Jean-Michel Jarre, CISAC President, will join a keynote debate on “Fairly remunerating creators in the digital environment. The challenges of the transfer of value”.

Key issues to be discussed will include: the challenges facing culture and creative industries in the digital environment; the need for harmonized and effective legislation; and how can artistic freedom be protected in the digital environment.

CISAC is working with its allies on a global campaign for governments to address the transfer of value. The problem is at the very heart of a global debate concerning the relationship between digital platforms and creators. Due to the rapid evolution of the digital market place, users have unprecedented access to cultural works via an array of different platforms, now led by streaming and subscription services.  These changes have helped transform access to and consumption of creative works in the digital world. However, they have also had a significant negative impact on creators, who are seeing the revenues that should be due to them siphoned off to profit some large digital services. Especially at risk are local creators and, in turn, cultural diversity.

The joint conference is being held at the UNESCO headquarters in Paris, and is taking place in the context of the ‘Conference of Parties to the 2005 convention on the Protection and Promotion of Diversity of Cultural Expression.’ Last December, UNESCO presented new ‘Operational Guidelines’ on the impact of digital technology on the diversity of cultural expressions. They seek to guide Member States on how to adapt their cultural policies to the new digital environment. The guidelines, which recognize and value the work of creators’ in the digital environment, will be presented for approval at the Conference of Parties for the UNESCO Convention on Cultural Diversity this week.

For more information, visit the CISAC website: http://www.cisac.org/Newsroom/Articles/CISAC-works-with-UNESCO-to-explore-ways-of-addressing-the-transfer-of-value

About PRS for Music

PRS for Music represents the rights of songwriters, composers and music publishers in the UK and around the world. As a membership organisation it works to ensure that creators are paid whenever their musical compositions and songs are streamed, downloaded, broadcast, performed and played in public. With over 100 representation agreements in place globally, PRS for Music's network represents over two million music creators worldwide. In 2017, 6.6 trillion performances of music were reported to PRS for Music with £717m collected on behalf of its members, making it one of the world’s leading music collective management organisations.

PRS for Music’s public performance licensing is now carried out on PRS for Music’s behalf by PPL PRS Ltd, the new joint venture between PPL and PRS for Music.