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Monday 9th August 2010

FLINTSTONES THE MOST RECOGNISABLE KIDS’ TV THEME TUNE

Latest research undertaken by PRS for Music, reveals that The Flintstones’ theme tune is the most recognisable of kids’ television programmes, according to the UK public.

The results of the survey, which was taken by 2,000 people across the UK, also show that Baa Baa Black Sheep is the nursery rhyme we remember most from our childhood, while up to 28% of females and 23% of males listen to music to make themselves feel younger.

Composed in 1961 by: Hoyt Curtin, Joseph Barbera and William Hanna, ‘Meet The Flintstones’ was first used as the defining theme tune at the beginning of the third episode of the third series, taking over from the original theme tune, ‘Rise and Shine’. The Flintstones will celebrate its 50th anniversary in September, 2010.

Most Recognisable Kids TV Theme Tune:

 Position Programme Composer 
 1 The Flintstones Joseph Barbera, William Hanna, Hoyt Curtin
 2 Top Cat  Joseph Barbera, William Hanna, Hoyt Curtin
 3 Postman Pat Bryan Dally
 4 Scooby Doo  David Mooks and Ben Raleigh
 5 The Wombles  Mike Batt
 6 Grange Hill  Alan Hawkshaw
 7 Jim'll Fix It  David Mindel and Roger Ordish
 8 Dangermouse  Cosgrove Hall Films
 9 Bagpuss  Nigel Eldridge
 10 Rainbow  Hugh Portnow, Hugh Fraser, Timothy Fuller

Source: PRS for Music

Commenting on the results, Mike Batt, composer of the Wombles, said: “Life is one big scramble for success and although I’ve had my ups, I am mortified to see that I made it only to number 5 compared to Postman Pat at number 3. I demand a recount!” 

Commenting on the results, Ellis Rich, chairman of PRS, said: “Many of us find our first love for music as children through singing nursery rhymes and humming along to our favourite theme tunes on television. It is a truly wonderful sensation when the recollection of music can bring back those nostalgic emotions of how music made us feel as children; emotions and memories which continue to live on inside so many adults, still to this day”.

ENDS

 

For more information, get in touch:

PRS for Music: Nicola Formoy
020 7306 4229

Votive Communications: Simon Chan
020 7353 9304


 

PRS for Music:
PRS for Music is the leading copyright and royalty collection society representing 65,000 songwriters, composers and music publishers.  A not-for-profit organisation it ensures music creators are paid whenever their music is played.

PRS for Music provides business and community groups easy access to 10m songs through its music licences.  In an industry worth £3.18bn PRS for Music is uniquely placed to be a voice for music and can provide data for all aspects of the business: live, broadcast, sales, online, touring and music creation and up to date analysis, research and trends about the industry.

www.prsformusic.com  
www.myspace.com/prsformusic 

Most Remembered Nursery Rhyme:

 Position  nursery Rhyme
 1  Baa Baa Black Sheep
 2  Twinkle Twinkle Little Star
 3  Humpty Dumpty
 4  If You’re Happy and You Know It
 5  The Grand Old Duke Of York
 6  Round and Round The Garden
 7  Incy Wincy Spider
 8  Jack and Jill
 9  Hickory Dickory Dock
 10  Little Miss Muffet

 

Source: PRS for Music


 
Press contacts

PRS for Music
29-33 Berners Street
London
W1T 3AB
Tel: +44 (0)20 7306 4777
e: press@prsformusic.com

Press Office Staff:
Olivia Chapman

Please note these contacts are for press enquiries only. If you have a general enquiry call the Switchboard on

020 7580 5544 

or visit Contact Us to find the number you need.

 
 
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PLEASE NOTE: On 1 July 2013 the legal entity behind the PRS for Music brand changed its registered name from The MCPS-PRS Alliance Limited to PRS for Music Limited.